We sped in a First Great Western train towards Oxford via Slough and Reading, passing through picturesque countryside, woolly green hills dotted with slate-roofed red brick houses; no water restrictions here; verdant pastures and flat crops under a vaulted cloud-filled sky. So different from drought-ravaged...

Tonight: Despite our best-laid plans, our travel was initially upset by the Qantas engineers' "requirements" (strike).  We were bused to the Ibis Hotel in Darling Harbour in Sydney to spend our first night, instead of in Singapore. Once we got to Singapore, we managed to grab six hours' "horizontal time" at the Traders' Hotel, before getting on the Qantas flight for London at 2 am the next morning. Flying over London at 7 am in fine weather was breathtaking. The first landmark that was pointed out to me on the edge of the Thames was "The London Eye," as it has become known: the highest ferris wheel in the world. Then I saw the Tower Bridge and felt like I was really in London. Londoners believe it to be the most famous bridge in the world, and yet most outsiders don't even know its name: "Isn't it London Bridge?" they ask. [caption id="attachment_13499" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]trafalgar square Trafalgar Square[/caption]

My very first water experience is in my mother’s womb. I'm safe, secure, warm. I swim, mermaid-like, do somersaults and swallow the magic fluid. I imagine that I'll never leave this watery place. [caption id="attachment_13286" align="aligncenter" width="535"] Down the Back[/caption] At Waterview the humid scorching air engulfs...

An editor at a recent workshop stressed the importance of "keeping it real", when writing fiction.  That is, at least partly, why I started off on the writing journey with memoir. From there I moved on to writing memoir using fictional techniques of characterisation and...